Reading · To Be Read

February TBR

I know I know, it’s been YEARS since I did a TBR post. I can’t quite remember why I stopped doing them–maybe because I put too much pressure on myself to actually complete the books I aimed to read–but I’m starting up again. Why? Well reader, I am in a MA-HOOSIVE book slump. I have been for a few months now. It’s one of those slumps where I keep picking up books I know I’ll love but can’t read for then a few pages. So, in the hopes of getting myself back into reading on the regular, I’d thought I’d set a reasonable TBR for this month and just see how it goes.

The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon

A world divided. A queendom without an heir. An ancient enemy awakens.40275288._SY475_

The House of Berethnet has ruled Inys for a thousand years. Still unwed, Queen Sabran the Ninth must conceive a daughter to protect her realm from destruction – but assassins are getting closer to her door.

Ead Duryan is an outsider at court. Though she has risen to the position of lady-in-waiting, she is loyal to a hidden society of mages. Ead keeps a watchful eye on Sabran, secretly protecting her with forbidden magic.

Across the dark sea, Tané has trained to be a dragonrider since she was a child, but is forced to make a choice that could see her life unravel.

Meanwhile, the divided East and West refuse to parley, and forces of chaos are rising from their sleep.

Demelza and the Spectre Detectors by Holly Rivers

51T3+bXbVqL._SX321_BO1,204,203,200_Demelza loves science – she loves it so much that she’s been known to stay up late to work on her peculiar inventions.

But Demelza discovers she has inherited a distinctly un-scientific set of skills: Spectre Detecting. Like her grandmother, she can summon the ghosts of the dead.

But when Grandma is kidnapped by a mysterious villain, she knows Spectre Detecting has something to do with it. Only Demelza and her pasty best friend, Percy, can solve the deadly mystery …

 

 

 

A Lab of One’s Own: Science and Suffrage in the First World War by Patricia Fara

Patricia Fara unearths the forgotten suffragists of World War I who bravely 36849105changed women’s roles in the war and paved the way for today’s female scientists.

Many extraordinary female scientists, doctors, and engineers tasted independence and responsibility for the first time during the First World War. How did this happen? Patricia Fara reveals how suffragists including Virginia Woolf’s sister, Ray Strachey, had already aligned themselves with scientific and technological progress, and that during the dark years of war they mobilized women to enter conventionally male domains such as science and medicine. Fara tells the stories of women including mental health pioneer Isabel Emslie, chemist Martha Whiteley, a co-inventor of tear gas, and botanist Helen Gwynne Vaughan. Women were carrying out vital research in many aspects of science, but could it last?

Though suffragist Millicent Fawcett declared triumphantly that “the war revolutionized the industrial position of women. It found them serfs, and left them free,” the truth was very different. Although women had helped the country to victory and won the vote for those over thirty, they had lost the battle for equality. Men returning from the Front reclaimed their jobs, and conventional hierarchies were re-established.

Fara examines how the bravery of these pioneers, temporarily allowed into a closed world before the door slammed shut again, paved the way for today’s women scientists.

So there you have it. Not particularly ambitious, but hopefully it’ll kick start my reading again!

What books are you hoping to read in February?

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